• xxx pic for ahp in jpg.jpgVolume One--Collected Papers

  • Volume 2A--Namzi Tibetan Life, Language and Folklore Volume One

  • Volume 2B--Namzi Tibetan Life, Language and Folklore Volume Two

  • Volume 3--Deity Men: Reb gong Tibetan Trance Mediums in Transition ལྷ་པ། ཨེ་ཤེ་ཡའི་མཐོ་སྒང་བསམ་བརྗོད། གླེགས་བམ ༣། ཤོག་གྲངས ༢༧༧།

  • Volume 4--China's Namzi Tibetan Songs, Engagement Chants, & Flute Music

  • Volume Five--A Tibetan Girl's Hair Changing Ritual

  • Volume Six--Collected Papers

  • Volume Seven--Passions and Colored Sleeves: Mongghul Lives in Eastern Tibet

  • Volume Eight--Mongghulni Jilaguni Da Adal [Mongghul Memories and Lives]

  • Volume Nine--A Ngawa Tibetan Childhood

  • Volume Ten--Collected Papers

  • Volume Eleven--A Mang rdzong Tibetan Life

  • Volume Twelve--Silence in the Valley of Songs

  • Volume Thirteen--Warming Your Hands With Moonlight: Lavrung Tibetan Oral Traditions and Culture

  • Volume Fourteen--Life, Religion, and Marriage in a Mi nyag Tibetan Village

  • Volume Fifteen--Rgyalrong Tibetan Village: Life, Language, and Folklore in Rgyas bzang Village

  • Volume Sixteen--Ghuran Janzi Boowu: Huzhu Mongghulni Nantari [Three Treasures: Huzhu Mongghul Folklore]

  • Volume Seventeen--A Zorgay Tibetan Childhood/ Min tibetanska barndom i Zorgay This autobiographical work describes the author's life growing up on the northeast Tibetan Plateau, in a farming community in Zorgay (Mdzod dge) County, Rnga ba Tibetan and QIang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province. The original English text and a Swedish translation are provided.

  • Volume Eighteen--Environmental Issues Facing Tibetan Pastoral Communities

  • Volume Nineteen--A Nomad Girl's Changing Worlds Sonam Doomtso (b. 1987) describes her lived experiences and recollections encompassing the first twenty years of her life. These include living on the grassland in Sichuan Province, experiences with relatives and neighbors, attending school, moving to Lhasa, religious fasting, pilgrimage, encounters with marmot hunters, attending school in Xining City, and the death of her beloved grandfather.

  • Volume Twenty--Ballad of the Huang River and Other StoriesThis volume features three novellas originally written in Chinese by the Qinghai author Jing Shi. The novellas provide a finely textured portrayal of Qinghai rural life in the twentieth century. An introduction and transcribed interview provide context to the stories and their author. From the introduction by Keith Dede: "The wide appeal of Jing Shi's fiction is certainly something he welcomes. As he sees it, literature, at one level, should be entertaining. Stories are a way for people to derive pleasure, enjoy a laugh, and while away some time. But stories are also about communication, about communicating ideas concerning the ironies of life and the trajectory of the human condition. Jing Shi thinks deeply about the people of rural Qinghai, their culture, their predicaments, their hopes, and their tragedies, and his stories communicate his thoughts about these things, but also his deep affection for the people and culture that raised him."

  • Volume Twenty-One AHP21 is the fourth volume of collected essays published by AHP. This volume features articles on English language education and globalization; New Year celebrations in A mdo; hail prevention rituals and practitioners; pyramid schemes on the Tibetan Plateau; Tibetans and Muslims in northwest China; sacred dairies, dairymen, and buffaloes of the Nilgiri Mountains in South India; an A mdo family's annual income and expenses; vernacular architecture; and cultural change in the context of a female rite of passage in A mdo. Volume 21 also contains six short stories and ten reviews.

  • Volume Twenty-Two Children in contemporary rural China have experienced an unprecedented moment; amid radical economic and social transformations that have sent their parents to urban centers to earn cash income, children have been left behind to live with older relatives. This fundamental redefining of place, parenting, and living has rarely been written about by the children themselves in English. Set in rural Hunan in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, this novel vividly describes farm production, the shift from an agricultural way of life to a life financially supported by migrant labor earnings, local religious life, Huagu opera, education, complex and violent relationships between family members and villagers, the deaths of the protagonist's (Maomao) mother and paternal grandmother, a wedding, funerals, and local festivals – from the perspective of a child. Refusing to drop out of school and become a migrant worker or a soldier, Maomao eventually achieves his dream of becoming a university student against all odds. This unvarnished and vividly written description of a contemporary rural life in China is uniquely important and appealing to a broad readership.

  • Volume Twenty-Three Rdo rje tshe brtan (b. 1986) describes his childhood in Dredze Village, Yiwa Township, Tewo County, Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Gansu Province, China, as well as being a student in Xining City, Qinghai Province. Topics covered include his family, childhood injuries and illnesses, education, Terang (malicious household deities), mountain deities and associated rituals and sacrifices, death, conflict with other locals, collecting local plants, a birth in the village, stealing fruit, a wedding, plowing, a visit to a hot spring, a lost yak, slaughtering pigs, government confiscation of fields, and slaughtering pigs. Photos provide additional detail.

  • Volume Twenty-Four A Multi-ethnic Village in Northeast Tibet - History, Ritual, and Daily Life in Chu cha by Stobs stag lha. Multi-ethnic Chu cha Village in Mchod rten thang Township, Dpa' ris Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu Province, China is described in terms of location; population; clothing; language; religion; history; and personal, family, and community rituals. Photographs provide additional information.

  • Volume Twenty-Five Jahzong - Tibetan Tribal Leader by Dzorge Guru. This novel, in English and Tibetan, is set on the eastern Tibetan Plateau in the era prior to 1949. It traces the life of a young man, Jahzong, from his dramatic childhood, following him in his struggles to unite local warring tribes and bring peace to his people.

  • Volume Twenty-Six A Tibetan Nomad Childhood by Kar+ma don 'grub. Kar+ma's life begins on the boundless Tibetan grassland in 1983 in Yushu (Yul shul) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sgnon (Qinghai) Province. Living in a black yak hair tent, Kar+ma begins tending his family's yak calves as soon as he can walk, in a grassland so barren that he is startled upon first seeing a tree at the age of eight. Charlatan livestock-stealing monks, anthrax, death, birth, happiness, and encounters with modern education create a powerful, unparalleled account of Tibetan nomad childhood in the late twentieth century - a way of life that will soon be forever gone.

  • Volume Twenty-Seven Tsering Bum (CK Stuart, Ramona Johnson, Solomon Rino, Gerald Roche, Timothy Thurston, and Gabriela Samcewicz, eds). 2013. A Northeastern Tibetan Childhood. Asian Highlands Perspectives 27. SUMMARY: Tsering Bum (b. 1985) describes his early life in Amdo in terms of dreams, herding, punishment from a lama, schooling experiences, attending a Kalachakra teaching, a lhatzi gathering, irrigation, his grandfather, archery, and other important moments and influences.

  • Volume Twenty-Eight AHP's 2013 annual collection contains 5 original research articles, 7 new pieces of fiction, & 20 reviews of recent books. ARTICLES. Ian G Baird-Shifting Contexts & Performances: The Brao-Kavet & Their Sacred Mountains in Northeast Cambodia. Dpa' mo skyid-The 'Descent of Blessings': Ecstasy & Revival among the Tibetan Bon Communities of Reb gong. Gerong Pincuo & Henrëtte Daudey-Too Much Loving-kindness to Repay: Funeral Speeches of the Wenquan Pumi. Wang Shiyong-Towards a Localized Development Approach for Tibetan Areas in China. William Noseworthy-The Cham's First Highland Sovereign-Po Romé (r. 1627-1651). FICTION. Bsod nams 'gyur med-Folktales from Gcig sgril. Lhundrom-Longing for Snow-covered Peaks: Deity Possession in the Philippines. Thub bstan-Elopement. Ba Lobsang Gonbo-Love in Shambala. Pad+ma skyabs-The Price of a Thesis. Pad ma rin chen-Scattered Memories of a Misspent Youth & Conflict. REVIEWS. 20 new books on Tibetan, Mongolian, Chinese, & Highland Southeast Asian studies.

  • Volume Twenty-Nine Tshes bcu lha mo, a native of Nor bu khug Village (Brag 'go Township, Brag 'go County Town, Dkar mdzes Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China) writes about her mother, her grandmother, and her great grandmother. She also describes her own childhood, including herding adventures, being attacked by a yak, education at home and in school, medical care, attending school in Zi ling (Xining), working in Lha sa and elsewhere in China, and attending school in the USA.

  • Volume Thirty Li Xiaoqiong (Drolma), a na53 mʑi53 zə11 Tibetan from Lianshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province describes her childhood; parents; paternal grandmother's early life and death; village life including children's games, tending horses, and herding yaks; her experiences at primary school; a surrogate grandfather; her youngest brother; local lunar New Year festivities; her time at middle school including a special friend and love letters; her schooling at Qinghai Normal University in Xining City; her time in India including college experiences, travels, working in an NGO, and working at a call center in Delhi; and her return to China. Also included are two original poems, three stories by Li Xiaoqiong's grandmother, and photographs of Li Xiaoqiong's village and of her time in India.

  • Volume Thirty-One A superb collection of 150 black-and-white photographs of 1930s Ladakh, capturing its final days as a hub of trade routes between Tibet and Kashmir, India and Yarkand. These portraits of people, landscapes and Buddhist ceremonies taken by amateur photographer Rupert Wilmot, are notable for their careful composition, fine detail and engaging informality. They have been meticulously researched and captioned by Nicky Harman and Roger Bates, respectively, niece and nephew of Rupert Wilmot, and include maps, an introduction and a bibliography. Of considerable historical and ethnographic interest. Claude Rupert Trench Wilmot (1897-1961) was a British army officer stationed in India during the 1930s, and a talented amateur photographer. Nicky Harman translates Chinese literature, and was formerly a lecturer at Imperial College London. Roger Bates digitized the photographs. A retired engineer, he has many years of experience working in digital photography.

  • Volume Thirty-Two This ground-breaking book provides unique insights into the knowledge and practices that helped pastoralists sustain the grasslands of Tibet for millennia. Following an introduction to the community, its territory, history, and other salient features, local pastoral production and the annual pastoral cycle are described. Remaining chapters deal with the naming, breeding, and management of livestock; wildlife; grassland plants; pasture management; weather prediction; rituals to ensure good fortune; and the treatment of livestock illnesses. Includes two maps, fifteen tables, sixty-six figures, a list of non-English terms with original orthography, and an index.

  • Volume Thirty-Three Farmers, Fugitives, Ghosts, and Exploding Grasshoppers: Everyday Life in Horse Race Village, a Tibetan Community on the Yellow River Rta rgyugs (Dajiu tan) is a natural farming village that is part of Rka phug (Gabu) Administrative Village, northwest of Khams ra (Kanbula) Town, Gcan tsha (Jianzha) County, Rma lho (Huangnan) Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Mtsho sngon (Qinghai) Province, PR China. Other aspects of the community are presented in terms of history, education, housing, eating, sleeping, archery, religion, livelihood, sources of cash income, stories, folktales, and photographs.

  • Volume Thirty-Four Limusishiden, Jugui, Kelly Ward, and CK Stuart. 2014. Fading Memories, Faded Lives: Mongghul (Tu) Photographs from Qinghai China. This collection of 131 photos features four introductions that discuss the development of commercial photography in the Huzhu area of Qinghai Province, China; details of photo collection; the social place of photographs within traditional socio-religious cultures; and how photographs are displayed within the home. For each photo there is commentary describing the when and where of their production and the people in each image. Biographic details include ethnicity, language abilities, family ties, educational background, garb and, at times, medical history.

  • Volume Thirty-Five This volume features research articles on Tibetan marmot hunting, Tibetan use of camels, Sinophone Tibetan author Alai, and yurt production and use, complimented by three short stories and seven book reviews.

  • Volume Thirty-Six This volume focuses on the people officially referred to in China as the Tu and more commonly known in the West as the Monguor. The Tu live mostly in Qinghai and Gansu provinces, on the northeast Tibetan Plateau. The thirteen contributions in this collection shed new light on diversity among the Tu, challenging representations that treat them as a homogenous category. This mapping of cultural and linguistic diversity is organized according to the three territories where the Monguor live: the Duluun Lunkuang 'The Seven Valleys', where the Mongghul language is spoken; Sanchuan 'The Three Valleys', where the Mangghuer language is spoken; and Khre tse Bzhi 'The Four Estates', where the Bonan language is spoken. In addition to mapping diversity among the Monguor in terms of these territories, we also map the project of the contemporary Chinese state and Western observers to describe and classify the Monguor. Consisting of translations of valuable source materials as well as original research articles, this book is an essential reference work for Tibetologists, Sinologists, Mongolists, and all those interested in cultural and linguistic diversity in Asia. Includes maps, images, references, article abstracts, and a list of non-English terms with original scripts.

  • Volume Thirty-Seven This collection of essays celebrates the life and work of Dr. Charles Kevin Stuart. For more than three decades, Kevin Stuart has quietly exerted considerable influence on scholarship on Tibet, China, and Mongolia, demonstrating a particular sensitivity to emic voices, facilitating collaborations between etic-emic viewpoints, but always striving to preserve and privilege the latter. It is possible when reading Kevin's writings, and the contributions gathered here, to 'center the local' by thinking within local horizons of meaning.

  • Volume Thirty-Eight THE WITCHES OF TIBET by Pema Kyi is a fictionalized account of a Tibetan girl's childhood in Mgo log (Golok) in Qinghai Province. The narrative begins with how a little girl's life was saved by a gift of a mysterious pill from a kind, local woman who locals regarded as a witch. These and other magic moments are from personal experiences that relatives and others related about their own lives, and what the author dreamed and imagined. This text illustrates how a Tibetan woman is influenced by those around her, the natural environment, and her dreams. In addition, four stories are given, two of which only women tell among themselves.

  • Volume Thirty-Nine BEING ANYTHING AND GOING ANYWHERE: AN A MDO TIBETAN AUTO-SONG-OGRAPHY by Sangs rgyas bkra shis, Qi Huimin, and CK Stuart describes singing in a pastoral community in Mtsho sngon Province, China. Performances at weddings, family gatherings, neighborhood gatherings, and on the grassland while herding are richly contextualized. Musical instruments, what it means to be a singer, the worries of singing publicly, the introduction of electricity and cell phones and their impact on singing, singing competitions, generational preference for song types, recent prohibitions on alcohol consumption, and access to social media are examined. Musical notation, oral and literary texts, and English translation are given. --Sang rgyas bkra shis’ BEING ANYTHING AND GOING ANYWHERE is a rich, vivid, and immensely informative account of songs and singing in Amdo. Written from personal experience but with a rigorous coverage and excellent illustration of music, texts, and contexts, this book is the next best thing to actually visiting Gcan tsha County. A beautiful and invaluable resource. Anna Morcom, University of London.

  • Volume Forty Features research articles on Tibetan mountain deities, Mongghul ritual, material culture in Ladakh, Tibetan ritual practitioners, Tibetan naming practices, and lifestyle migration in Dali; two folklore collections; and twenty-one book reviews.